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3DLizzy's WIPs

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  • Vortex5972Vortex5972209 Posts: 1,116Member
    Details are looking awesome.
    Lizzy777
  • publiusrpubliusr289 Posts: 1,424Member
    That is lovely. I might have had one tube below and between two slightly larger forward phaser banks. The top of the saucer would be reversed with the side banks a bit larger
    Lizzy777
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777462 PNWPosts: 578Member
    Vortex5972 wrote: »
    Details are looking awesome.

    Why thank you!
    publiusr wrote: »
    That is lovely. I might have had one tube below and between two slightly larger forward phaser banks. The top of the saucer would be reversed with the side banks a bit larger

    My overall plan is simply enhancing the Enterprise as seen in ST:DISCO. It, like the original TOS Enterprise, has a pair of tubes down there that are flush with the hull. At least that's what these reference pics I'm using suggest. I got stuff from Eaglemoss, Polar Lights, early concept art, and a few fuzzy screen renders from the show. None of which match 100% to each other.

    I think apart from resizing the phaser banks, I'm pretty much done with this area until I start textures. I'm debating whether I should work on the rim of the saucer or detail the underside of the engine deck next. Also, how much detail do I want to add at the neck connection is another one of the things in the back of my mind. Like, do I want connectors similar to what we see on the 1701-D? Or do I keep it simpler than that? What about landing gear and ramps? That's what those triangles on the underside were supposedly going to be at one point if I recall.

    There's a lot to consider going forward. And I haven't even touched the bridge yet! LOL
    publiusr
    "Cry 'Havoc!,' and let slip the corgies of war!"
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777462 PNWPosts: 578Member
    edited April 20 #335
    Okay! Just a quick post since I haven't actually done much on the starship.

    There was an update email sent out that showed some of the tabletop miniatures that are due out soon. And one of those was the Battle Cobra that I'd worked on months ago. Now that the NDA on this particular piece had been lifted, I just wanted to show the low-rez pic that was attached to the announcement.

    The hexes on that map are about 31mm wide, and the mini itself stands around 50mm tall (I'd have to check to be sure).

    I'm really happy with this one because it sets a lot of landmarks for me. First official production model (where in the past it's all been fan art), as well as the last model I did in TrueSpace before picking up Blender. I can hardly wait to get my hands on one! But...like everyone else. I have to sit by until the game boxes ship.

    CURSE YOU EVER GIVEN! Blocking the canal has delayed my happiness by weeks!

    Er... Anyway. The Battle Cobra tabletop mini!

    DdUJTN8.jpg

    I also posted a link to a collage showing some progress snapshots on DeviantArt. Really it's mostly the same stuff I've already posted here. Battle Cobra: From Sketch to Production
    Post edited by Lizzy777 on
    "Cry 'Havoc!,' and let slip the corgies of war!"
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777462 PNWPosts: 578Member
    edited August 29 #336
    Whooo... Four months this time around? Ah well. Since I'm between work projects, and now that I've found some new reference images for the impulse section of the reboot Enterprise, I figured I'd give this model another crack.

    RwcxVWN.png

    So. Here are the blocked-out sections on the rear of the saucer. I'd done a little detailing on the underside before this. Embellished the...impulse exhaust vents? Those things in sets of three whatever they are. Embellished them with some hex grids, because few things say Sci-Fi like hex grids!

    QGjlExm.png

    I have no idea if the bits I've added are what they're supposed to be. The reference images I have aren't all that clear. Even then the shapes look pretty basic. The docking hatch in the center? None of the models I've seen have any detail there. Could be a torpedo tube for all I know. Or it could be a mounting point for a filming gimble.

    So I turned it into a docking hatch. I detailed the entryway based on the ones seen in ST: Discovery S2E13 when the crew of the Discovery transferred over to the Enterprise. The heavy doors are based on one of the Behind the Scenes teasers where Michael Burnam walks through them as they open up.

    df93tC4.png

    Are those windows? I don't know if they're supposed to be windows. But I made them windows anyway. I also figure the detail next to them are the DOT-7 repair drone bays. So I added simple garage door style closures. And the last bit is... I have NO idea. So I haven't changed them into anything meaningful.

    If I can't think of more detail to add to this area, I might start on those oversized Impulse Engines.
    Post edited by Lizzy777 on
    ashleytingerrojren
    "Cry 'Havoc!,' and let slip the corgies of war!"
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777462 PNWPosts: 578Member
    OK, so the big update here isn't the model, but my settings. I managed to upgrade to a GeForce 1060 from a GTX 750 ti, (because I can't really afford more than $200) and learned about Blender's Filmic settings.

    After switching from sRGB to XYZ and enabling medium contrast under the Filmic setting, I tried a quick render test to compare it to my previous card. being able to see these smaller details with a higher dynamic range in display output is really going to help me work out the smaller details!

    KolaLDD.png
    Warp Propulsion Laboratorypubliusrsrspicer
    "Cry 'Havoc!,' and let slip the corgies of war!"
  • ashleytingerashleytinger818 Central OhioPosts: 781Member
    SO MUCH DETAIL. Love it!
    Lizzy777
  • psCargilepsCargile377 Posts: 611Member
    Fantastic work.

    A way to do nondestructive panel lines is to make panels from a plane and give them a solidify and bevel modifiers. I usually collapse all the verts in a plane, snap it to the surface I'm working on, extrude certs, fill, and then duplicate a vert for the next panel. This method gives a lot of freedom of shaping panels, plus you can make areas to extrude for panels sections that extend higher than your height in the solidifier tab. And like all meshes, they can be duplicated, arrayed, and mirrored. One reason I do not favor inset faces is because I use the bevel modifier heavily, and tight insets decrease bevel radius. And being nondestructive, you got room to make changes. Or they could be used as a means to plan destructive panels line by insets or other means later on.
    Lizzy777
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777462 PNWPosts: 578Member
    SO MUCH DETAIL. Love it!

    Thanks! Not quite MKF levels (yet) but I've been thinking of how to add more in some of these blank areas. I rarely get a chance to do 4th level of detail like this either because the project doesn't need it, or because I'd been limited by my hardware.
    psCargile wrote: »
    Fantastic work.

    A way to do nondestructive panel lines is to make panels from a plane and give them a solidify and bevel modifiers. I usually collapse all the verts in a plane, snap it to the surface I'm working on, extrude certs, fill, and then duplicate a vert for the next panel. This method gives a lot of freedom of shaping panels, plus you can make areas to extrude for panels sections that extend higher than your height in the solidifier tab. And like all meshes, they can be duplicated, arrayed, and mirrored. One reason I do not favor inset faces is because I use the bevel modifier heavily, and tight insets decrease bevel radius. And being nondestructive, you got room to make changes. Or they could be used as a means to plan destructive panels line by insets or other means later on.

    I've tried to use plane modeling where I conform it to the surface (like all of those subpanels I have between the shield grid - done simply with Discombublator), but the end shape doesn't seem to conform properly for one reason or another.

    Not unless I have a hidden, higher polygon shape underneath it. Then I'd have to stack objects and modifiers. And...I'm not up to that skill level just yet. It's hard for me to wrap my head around it, so I go with what I know and will pick up new techniques as I need them.

    I have two basic techniques for making panel lines. First I'll make sure my base geometry has the lines where I need them. A mistake I made when I started the saucer - but fixing that taught me a number of other techniques that have been useful later and in other projects.

    And that's been the point of building this model. Learning Blender! LOL Even if my method is akin to a monkey pressing buttons and seeing what happens.

    Then I'll either select the lines, use the bevel tool to get the gap width I need, and then the inset tool for the floor depth and wall angles. If I'm building up, I'll select the faces instead, use the inset tool for gap width, and then use it again for panel height and wall angle. If my corners need curves, then I'll use the bevel tool again. It's easy enough for me to zoom in and edit verts and lines if there's overlapping and/or pinching. Deleting verts where necessary and making new connections to "hide my crimes".

    These methods are new to me and a LOT different than how I did them in TrueSpace. I'd basically brute force the shapes I wanted by creating bucks, then using boolean tools to add or subtract objects. Something that ended up with far more geometry errors than what I do now. Plus it was a lot more difficult to fix later on if I needed it.

    These days, my geometry and shapes are a lot neater and cleaner than before. I'm sure I'll need to up my game when I move onto more organic shapes with complex curves and the like. But that's a task for future me to learn.
    "Cry 'Havoc!,' and let slip the corgies of war!"
  • psCargilepsCargile377 Posts: 611Member
    edited September 1 #341
    These methods are new to me and a LOT different than how I did them in TrueSpace.

    I believe that's everyone experience. I came off of Rhinoceros to Blender 2.64 back when booleans were trash. Vast improvements over the years, and sometimes I think my Rhino models were better because, like you, I was using a lot of booleans to get the geometry I wanted and there was no inset face options. My earlier Blender models had too many of the trademark Inset Faces/Extrude look, which made the models look far less impressive to me that what I could get out of booleans. However, extruding insets certainly have their uses, and I do use them. The method I use for panels can be a little more work, but it doesn't restrict you to the mesh wireframe, and for precision it best to use guides such as single arrow empties and mesh circles (you can't control the number of segments on an circle empty), and of course, the wireframe of the object you are paneling. And while this method is great for visual rendering, I cannot see it being used if you want to merge all your objects into one mesh, or if you want to make a printable model. I can see some major headaches with that. But the good thing that there are more than one way to get the results you want with Blender, and that matters is how good it looks when its done.

    You can look over on my Repulse to see the panels I had made.

    Oh, and Discombobulate is new to me. I've seen in it the menu, but never knew what it was for, and it looks worth trying out. Thanks for sharing that.
    Post edited by psCargile on
    Lizzy777publiusr
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