Greetings!

Welcome to Scifi-Meshes.com! Click one of these buttons to join in on the fun.

Greetings!

Welcome to the fancy new Scifi-Meshes.com! You old username and password should work. If not, get in touch with staff either here, on Facebook or on Discord.

For a quick summary on what's new, check out this thread.
You should also check out the Community Guidelines here.
You can check out most recent posts here or by clicking the handy links on the top menu or the sidebar.

You can dismiss this message by clicking the little X in the top right corner.

3DJupiter 2 Spacecraft - Season 1

TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
edited June 2010 in Work in Progress #1
Hey folks,

After following Avian's excellent Jupiter 2 thread, and seeing JWWright's comment on seeing a version of the Season 1 Jupiter 2, I decided to give it a go. I will switch between this model and my Millenium Falcon to give me a bit of a break.

The Jupiter 2 is one of those classic designs I have always loved, and this will now be my third model of it. This time around though, I plan on going for being as accurate as possible with it.

Lost In Space (LIS) was originally done as a pilot (which never aired) by Irwin Allen. There was no B9 robot or Doctor Smith in it. It was just the Robinson Family and Major West. Their spaceship was called the Gemini 12, a one level design which was supposed to take the family to Alpha Centauri. The studio liked the pilot, but called it a bit boring and needed to spice it up a bit. Thus the character's of Doctor Smith and the robot were born. The Gemini 12 became the Jupiter 2, a multi-level craft which could better house the family on it's voyages. The exterior of the ship was slightly altered and some elements were changed on the flight deck (like adding an airlock!).

The pilot episode was broken up and a lot of the footage was used in the first 4 or 5 episodes. So, whenever you saw exterior space shots of the Jupiter 2, it was actually the Gemini 12. Even some interior shots were reused, like whenever Smith and the Robot were not in the scene.

So, for this project, I will be modelling the Jupiter 2, and not the Gemini 12. Exterior changes that were made for the Jupiter 2 will be incorporated into my model. Interior will be as close to the 1st season as possible. For instance, there was no center console in the Season 1 Jupiter 2. Instead, that was used to house the pilot's chair. It would fold up and slide into the center console. The Gemini 12 had a raised floor around the perimiter of the flight deck. Someone had mentioned it in Avian's thread and I confirmed it in the videos. The Jupiter 2 did not have the raised floor, so mine will be flat.

Now, on to the modeling!

I first started by getting the hull profile as accurate as I could, based on some blueprints and photographs of the studio 4 foot Jupiter 2 model. I then built the interior 8 wall dividers to determine the correct size and location of the cockpit windows and hatch. This gave me the correct width for the windows (which didn't line up with the drawings) and placement of the hatch (which also didn't line up with the drawings). So far, everything is just roughly modelled so I can get things in the correct place. I will worry about beveling edges and stuff like that a bit later.

Al

[edit]
Updated thumbnail image...
[/edit]
Post edited by Tralfaz on
Tagged:

Posts

  • AvianAvian170 Posts: 208Member
    Hi Tralfaz. I'm glad you started on the J2. This could be fun! As soon as I saw your image I was reminded of a couple of things I needed to tweak on my model and ended up in an obsessive spiral that kept me up far too long last night!!

    I often lurk on these boards admiring the scale and complexity of (especially) the Star Trek models and I think about how seemingly simple the old Jupiter 2 is by comparison. But she's got some subtle lines and proportions that just have to be correct, and you nailed the profile perfectly. I'm looking forward to seeing more!
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Thanks Avian.

    I know what you mean about getting into that obsessive spiral. Been there many, many times. Just ask my wife! :lol:

    The profile is one of the most import parts of the J2. It is amazing how different it can look on the different blueprints. I used to have the blueprints drawn by Shane Johnson, the Alpha Control Technical Manual and another set of blueprints (can't remember who did them though). I had the Lunar Models 16 inch kit and the Polar Lights model kit. Money was tight a few years ago, and had to sell all that stuff. Wish I had it now!

    Update:
    • reworked the front cockpit window frames to make them more accurate
    • added side porthole
    • worked on airlock (twice, didn't like the first one)
    • tweaked bulkhead
    • adjusted floor size and position

    Al
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    This looks like it will be an interesting exercise. Trying to reconcile the interior of the Jupiter 2 with the exterior is (pardon the cliche) trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. Just like so many other sci-fi TV series and movies, the filmmakers rarely worried about whether or not the interiors would really fit inside the exterior shape of a ship. As long as it looked like it did, that was good enough. Best of luck on this project. I'm loking forward to seeing more images as you move forward.
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Trying to reconcile the interior of the Jupiter 2 with the exterior is (pardon the cliche) trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

    You've got that right! I spent the weekend reworking some of the exterior in order to reconcile it with the interior.

    I've been working on roughing in some of the interior pieces to make sure everything was going to fit properly. The 'wall dividers with light panels' can only fit in one spot, so that was a no brainer, although I had to alter the depth of the bottom of the dividers based on photos of the placements of the freezing tubes. I modelled the airlock interior hatch based on original blueprints. It fit perfectly into my airlock and looked correct. However, when I modelled the communications panel and storage locker, there was way too large of a space between it and the airlock. Again, using photographs and clips from the show, I reworked them in order to better match the TV show. This meant I had to relocate the porthole and widen the exterior hatch and airlock a slight amount. Things are looking better now. This does indeed prove Buckaroohawk's point!

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Been doing some more roughing in of the interior pieces. I transferred a couple of the video tapes to the PC, so I can scrub through the videos frame by frame looking for the best detail shots. This has helped out quite a bit.

    Applied some basic materials to see what things will look like. The reflections and AO add quite a bit to the render times, but lI really ike the way it looks.

    Al
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    I'm loving the reflections! I'd like to add them to many of my own models because they add amazing realism, but I just can't stand how much they slow render time. It drives me nuts.

    Oh, and don't forget that in the 3rd season of "Lost in Space" they added a third level to the Jupiter 2. It was a small Engineering/Control Room located under the lower level (where the sleeping quarters were). If I remember correctly it was only seen once when Will had to go down and do something that would save the ship from exploding or something like that. It was only accessible by a ladder along the back wall; a ladder that mysteriously appeared for just that one episode then vanished again. Also, I'm curious how you are going to reconcile the layout of the second level with the location of the ship's landing gear?

    Am I opening too many cans of worms here? If so, just tell me to keep my geek mouth shut. ;-)
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    I'm loving the reflections! I'd like to add them to many of my own models because they add amazing realism, but I just can't stand how much they slow render time. It drives me nuts.

    I know what you mean! I have a Quad Core 2.6 GHz cpu and some of the renders are already taking around 2 hours with reflections and AO turned on. I've recently bought an e-book on digital lighting, so I am hoping there will be some tips in there for proper lighting while cutting down on render times.
    Oh, and don't forget that in the 3rd season of "Lost in Space" they added a third level to the Jupiter 2. It was a small Engineering/Control Room located under the lower level (where the sleeping quarters were). If I remember correctly it was only seen once when Will had to go down and do something that would save the ship from exploding or something like that. It was only accessible by a ladder along the back wall; a ladder that mysteriously appeared for just that one episode then vanished again. Also, I'm curious how you are going to reconcile the layout of the second level with the location of the ship's landing gear?

    I remember seeing that episode when I was a kid with the infamous 3rd level. Amazing how they could pack so much stuff into such a small ship! :lol: Luckily, I am just doing the Season 1 version of the J2.

    I've been thinking about how I could add a second level to the ship and what I think I might do, is to separate the outer hull into two objects, Upper and Lower halves. The lower deck and lower hull will be controled by an On/Off user control. That way, if there is an exterior shot, the lower hull will be turned on and the lower deck will be off. As I move into the upper flight deck, the lower hull will be turned off and the lower deck turned on. That way, I could have a single continuous shot of going inside the ship through the airlock, cross the upper flight deck, and travel down the ladder or elevator to the lower deck. It would be totally seamless on screen. At least that's the current plan.....
    Am I opening too many cans of worms here? If so, just tell me to keep my geek mouth shut. ;-)

    Nah, you're not a geek... yet. If you had told me that the call numbers on the side of the space pod were actually Irwin Allen's office phone number, then I would have called you a geek. Crap! Now I am a geek... :D

    Al
  • AvianAvian170 Posts: 208Member
    Tralfaz wrote: »
    Nah, you're not a geek... yet. If you had told me that the call numbers on the side of the space pod were actually Irwin Allen's office phone number, then I would have called you a geek. Crap! Now I am a geek... :D

    Al

    OMG, is that true? That's funny.

    Keep going Al! Looking great so far. I have lots of info on the saucer that I'd be happy to share if you ever need it, although I suspect you are a bigger geek than me regarding LIS :) and you probably already have what you need.

    Regarding render times, it seems like two hours is excessively long. However, I don't know much about Cinema 4d or Lightwave if that's what you are using so I could be off base here. I am using my old home computer for my LIS build (P4, 1.6GHz with 1.5 G of RAM) and my longest render is about 18 minutes. I try to keep them in the 2-5 minute range for the animations so I can run off a test overnight. Granted, I'm using simple area lights which aren't the greatest but they work well for WIP shots.
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    OMG, is that true? That's funny.

    From what I read, it is supposed to be true!
    Keep going Al! Looking great so far. I have lots of info on the saucer that I'd be happy to share if you ever need it, although I suspect you are a bigger geek than me regarding LIS and you probably already have what you need.

    Thanks Avian. I will keep your offer in mind should I need anything else. A few days ago, I order the Alpha Control Technical Manual (4th Edition). Should be getting it n a week or so.
    Regarding render times, it seems like two hours is excessively long. However, I don't know much about Cinema 4d or Lightwave if that's what you are using so I could be off base here. I am using my old home computer for my LIS build (P4, 1.6GHz with 1.5 G of RAM) and my longest render is about 18 minutes. I try to keep them in the 2-5 minute range for the animations so I can run off a test overnight. Granted, I'm using simple area lights which aren't the greatest but they work well for WIP shots.

    Yeah, the render times are way too long. It is fine for a still image, but would not be feasible for doing any animations. I can always cut back on the anti-aliasing settings to help speed things up. The 2 hour render had really high settings. Eliminating the AO will also help cut down render times. I really like your lighting and materials/textures you are using.

    Update:

    I think I am done with the rough positioning of the different interior parts. So, now I can start working on the details. The existing parts still need to be tweaked, but everything is positioned where I want them.

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Update: Detailed Parts

    This is the part that I look forward to doing. I've started working on the detailed parts. The first piece I am working on is the Electrodata Cabinets that sit on top of the flight consoles. They were also used in the Alpha Control control room.

    As I mentioned earlier, I am going to try and be as detailed and accurate to the first season as I can. There are a ton of little lights on these things, and I hope to be able to have them dynamically animated. Just have to figure out how to do that in C4D.

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Update:

    Finished modeling and texturing the Electrodata B205 Cabinet. I was lucky enough to find two different Yahoo groups that had measured drawings taken from the original props, as well as close up photos of the markings on the panels. This was incredibly helpful in labeling the different panels and controls.

    Based on screen grabs from Season 1, the center and right consoles, did not have any type of meter in the upper right corner of the panel. The left console would sometimes have the 'comsic radiation' meter and sometimes not. And this would happen in the same episode. I don't think they were reusing the pilot clips, but I can't think why it would appear in one shot, but not the other.

    The render on the left was done without AO and took 4 seconds to render. The one on the right had AO turned on and took 6 minutes and 45 seconds to render. The AO may look better and will probably use it for a final still render, but for animations, AO is definitely out.

    Al
  • HundredHundred178 Posts: 939Member
    Very nice Tralfaz. Good stuff. :thumb:
  • EBOLIIEBOLII177 Posts: 325Member
    Console details looks fantastic....looking really good thus far
  • AvianAvian170 Posts: 208Member
    Those look great! I love the tiny detail you've put into the consoles. You're a better man than I, I tell 'ya. :)

    I know that a lot of the show's props were actual electronic components from various sources, but I am astounded at how much work went into altering them for cameras so that they seemed logical aboard a spaceship. I doubt many TV shows of that era ever went into such detail.

    I found a pic of this, for example. It's the Robot's control panel located on one of the consoles on the lower level. It was probably rarely, if ever, shown close-up, but someone in the art department made sure it made some sense.

    robotcontrolpanel2.jpg
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Thanks everyone.

    That is a great find Avian! It would have to have been an extreme close-up shot to have any of that text readable on the TV sets of the 1960's. It is nice to see that there was such a great amount of attention to detail.

    Update:

    Started working on one of the flight consoles. This is the radar unit. I don't think I have the blue lights quite correct. On the blueprint, it was labeled as an aircraft lamp. It looked like a regular lamp the way it was drawn, but in the screen shots from the series, they don't quite look like lamps. Need to get some better reference on those.

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Update:

    Got a bit more done on the flight console. Got the 'Lift Off Rockets' panel done and started on the 'Sage' panel. Not sure why it is called the Sage panel though. Still have some more to do on it, like knobs and lights and a couple more switches.

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Update:

    Had some time to finish the right flight control panel and mount it into the console. The left control panel is completed as well, as it is the same as the right control panel except the layout being a mirror image. Will work on that tomorrow (well actually later today).

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    And here we have the completed flight console. The center section was used to store the pilot's seat when not in use. The center console didn't come into play until season two.

    I think I am going to have to add more RAM to my computer and switch to a 64 bit OS. I've started getting 'Out Of Memory' errors. I guess going high detail has it's price...

    Al
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    I'm VERY impressed with how this project is coming along. You've done a great job keeping an eye on the details to make this an authentic CGI replica. I've never been able to do that. I always end up making changes based on my own ideas of logical placement, aesthetics, whatever. You're going to have something really special when this model is done. Keep up the great work!
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Thank you Buckaroohawk. My wife thinks I am a little too obsessed with this, but what else is new? :lol:

    Update:

    Worked on the Communications Station. Have a bit of work to do around the storage room door and need to find some reference for what is actually inside the recessed area in between the two sage panels. Smith smashes that glass, but I have not seen any good closeups of what is actually under the glass.

    Al
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Well, it's been a while since I posted an update, so here goes.

    I've been working on the freezing tube stations. They were a bit harder than I thought they would be, but am pretty happy with them so far. Had to rescale the tubes that I originally had and then work on the wall panels in behind them. Need to rework some of the controls behind the tubes and a few other little details.

    Al
  • JWWrightJWWright171 Posts: 0Member
    This nostalgic gem is in good hands, your work is top. I have a new appreciation for the design of this set.
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    JWWright wrote: »
    This nostalgic gem is in good hands, your work is top. I have a new appreciation for the design of this set.

    I always liked this set as well. It had a very functional and seemingly spacious design...though I was always a little dubious of having the freezing tubes in such an unsecure environment. I also felt that the piloting controls were too low to the floor, but I think they did that so they could have that nice big window in the front to showcase the environment outside the ship. Which leads me to a question: Does anyone know if the Jupiter 2 interior set and the planetary exterior (of whatever planet they inevitably crashed on) was all on one soundstage, or were transitions from the inside of the ship to the outisde done through clever film editing?
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 787Member
    Thanks Jeffery, very much appreciated.

    I agree with you Buckaroohawk. I've loved the J2 set since I first saw it as a kid. The freezing tubes, although kind of neat, were hardly ever used after the crash in the first season. And as an adult looking back on it, standing while "frozen" inside the tube is really impractical. For the amount the ship was tossed around while they were in the tubes, they never seemed to bounce off the insides at all.

    As for the Jupiter 2 upper level set, I believe it was integrated into the exterior planet set as well. I remember reading about how the J2 was built with fly-away sections so pie slices could be removed to make room for the camera. You can see on some planet shots right in through the view port and hatch that the interior upper level set was there.

    It's been a while since I've been able to work on this, due to work and being away on a training course. So, the update isn't a lot other than finishing off the astrogator.

    Al
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    The original designers were probly thinking in terms of bed sores. This why you only have to worry about foot sores. Secondly, they might also have been thinking about deck space, and how to minimize the impact there of of the freeze tubes.
  • hamiltonplhamiltonpl0 Posts: 0Member
    As I've mentioned before - this model is looking really good. I am curious to see what the render times in POSER would be. I usually adjust somewhere in the middle settings when doing animations othewise it would take FOREVER. Great job on this model.

    Here are some of the meshes I've used in POSER. I've got the Space Pod, Jupiter 2, and Chariot. They don't hold a candle to the model in this thread.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dc_oN9OP0x0
  • MatrixWorkzMatrixWorkz171 Posts: 4Member
    This blows my current Poser model out of the water hands down. I'm lovin' it! You can see I orignally started using mine in Bryce 4 on my YouTube page. I eventually cobled together a passable interior using Poser Primitives and Carrara but nothing as accurate as what you've done.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/Mizrael
Sign In or Register to comment.