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3DEvened out the thrust lol

Paul MoechnerPaul Moechner428 Posts: 89Member
edited December 2022 in Finished Work #1
As an experiment, I evened out the thrust that would be generated by the Enterprise and this is what happened lol

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Post edited by Guerrilla on
evil_genius_180StarCruiserscifiericLizzy777caveat_imperator
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  • evil_genius_180evil_genius_1802437 Posts: 10,224Member
    Interesting. I've actually seen ship designs like this before. Though, the only engines on the ship that actually generate thrust are the impulse engines. According to the fictional propulsion systems, the warp drive doesn't generate thrust. In fact, the ship doesn't actually move when it's at warp, space around the ship moves. The nacelles generate a warp field bubble that the ship resides in when this happens.
    Paul Moechnerscifieric
  • TallguyTallguy262 Posts: 439Member
    Interesting. I've actually seen ship designs like this before. Though, the only engines on the ship that actually generate thrust are the impulse engines. According to the fictional propulsion systems, the warp drive doesn't generate thrust. In fact, the ship doesn't actually move when it's at warp, space around the ship moves. The nacelles generate a warp field bubble that the ship resides in when this happens.

    Oh good. You said it so that I didn't have to. =)

    Paul Moechnerscifiericevil_genius_180
    Bill "Tallguy" Thomas All I ask is a tall ship...
    Various Work: U.S.S. Constellation - Matt Jefferies Concept Shuttle
  • Paul MoechnerPaul Moechner428 Posts: 89Member
    edited December 2022 #4
    Tallguy wrote: »
    Interesting. I've actually seen ship designs like this before. Though, the only engines on the ship that actually generate thrust are the impulse engines. According to the fictional propulsion systems, the warp drive doesn't generate thrust. In fact, the ship doesn't actually move when it's at warp, space around the ship moves. The nacelles generate a warp field bubble that the ship resides in when this happens.

    Oh good. You said it so that I didn't have to. =)

    What's interesting about real life warp drive theory, (and it boggles my mind that it's an actual field of study now and no longer science fiction) is that I've heard two alternate explanations on how a warp drive would work.

    1. What you guys have described I actually discovered on youtube a couple years ago and I've been exploring the FTL R&D rabbit hole ever sense lol.

    2. This second form of warp drive theory I discovered, (my understanding of this might not be completely correct because I'm still learning from fellow members of the AsteronX team that does FTL propulsion R&D) that the "Warp Field" basically creates a 'less positive' region of space time around the craft, which allows the reaction engines, plasma thrusters and photon rocket (what we star trek fans call the warp nacelle), to push the starship up to the speed of light. The Warp field both reduces mass and negates time dilation but it doesn't produce thrust. In this type of Warp Drive theory, what we call the warp nacelles are reaction engines, and the "warp field generator" is a separate component and therefore a warp coil or coils would be in a different part of the ship instead of inside the warp nacelles. The deflection system (what we call the main deflector) would help keep small pieces of matter such as space dust or micro meteoroids from colliding with the ship at high speeds, which would also reduce drag.

    Post edited by Paul Moechner on
    scifiericevil_genius_180
  • evil_genius_180evil_genius_1802437 Posts: 10,224Member
    edited December 2022 #5
    As much of Star Trek science as possible is based on real world science. While a lot of what they do isn't currently possible, Star Trek does regularly employ scientific advisors to make it as close to either proven science or at least scientific theory as possible. Many NASA scientists have even volunteered their time over the years to help the shows and movies. After all, what's done on Star Trek is what they're aiming for.
    Post edited by evil_genius_180 on
    Paul Moechner
  • Paul MoechnerPaul Moechner428 Posts: 89Member
    As much of Star Trek science as possible is based on real world science. While a lot of what they do isn't currently possible, Star Trek does regularly employ scientific advisors to make it as close to either proven science or at least scientific theory as possible. Many NASA scientists have even volunteered their time over the years to help the shows and movies. After all, what's done on Star Trek is what they're aiming for.

    Oh yeah that's one of the biggest things I love about Star Trek. This is also the biggest reason on why I enjoy watching the Expanse so much. It's so awesome whenever a scifi show or movie incorporates as much known science into it to make it more believable. I could be totally wrong about this but I'm under the impression that the first type of warp drive theory is what a lot of starships on star trek is based on. If so, then it would explain why I always find warp coils inside the warp nacelles when I look up schematics on those ships instead of in the engineering sections/secondary hulls.
    evil_genius_180
  • Hunter GHunter G1606 Posts: 505Member
    Hahaha I love this!

    On the note of thrust, I always thought that Impulse wasn't thrust either, but that the impulse drive would "pull" on space in whatever direction. Picture a rope running through the ship, and the impulse drive as a guy pulling on the rope, thus pulling the ship. Then imagine infinite ropes in infinite directions.

    The drive itself would look almost like a gyroscope, and the glowing bits at the back are just the exhaust. That way, the impulse engines can make the ship go up right left down reverse and everything in between without needing to use thrusters. The RCS "thrusters" would be miniature versions of the same thing, but just used to reorient the ship. To combat the name issue, it can be chalked up to the same reason drydock is still called dry dock in space; the names for old tech just stuck.

    I hope no one minds me indulging in a little imagination!
    Paul Moechnerevil_genius_180
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