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2D300 ton Far Trader (Traveller): 2D plans

13

Posts

  • cavebearcavebear178 Posts: 623Member
    When I read this post I took the dimensions and made a table with fold down sides so you could reach both sides of the patient without a problem. See here:
    travellertable2mod-1.png

    TravellerTable5mod-1.jpg

    TravellerTable4mod-1.jpg

    Hope this gives you an idea for your table/operating bed :)
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    Note that the Versis are known for their Quite Liberal Use of Morphic Materials in their designs. The Air raft, which is the size of a Cargo Van is able to compact itself to fit in the much smaller air raft bay by collapsing all the empty volume within itself to become a mostly flat plank.

    So the dining table could easily be both the surgical table, and the patent beds.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    cavebear: I was thinking along those lines.

    concept-table.jpg

    I'll probably go with this solution. Dave: I know about "morphic" material, but I'm a little wary of it. :D not quite clear on how it works - not the technical details, mind you, but when it's an acceptable practice vs. a borderline-loophole for design flaws.
  • Fre'dniFre'dni0 Posts: 0Member
    Capt Dave wrote: »
    Note that the Versis are known for their Quite Liberal Use of Morphic Materials in their designs. The Air raft, which is the size of a Cargo Van is able to compact itself to fit in the much smaller air raft bay by collapsing all the empty volume within itself to become a mostly flat plank.

    So the dining table could easily be both the surgical table, and the patent beds.

    Oooh, can you use that material for the hull, and compact certain areas, to save on jump fuel?

    Cavebears idea was good, why also include slide out cabinets, on the tables underside, for med supplies.
    Traq, always remember, when you post here you might get a lot of heartfelt advice, which some might be dumb(me), but also will get great ideas.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    From my understanding (correct me if I'm wrong, Dave) morphic materials don't have variable mass, they're just re-form-able (e.g., there isn't more or less of it, it can just be re-arranged / re-shaped), so I don't think it would save on fuel cost one way or the other. I bet the rule book would probably be against the idea, too. (I'm assuming fuel cost is based on vehicle mass, not volume... right?)

    and yes, absolutely - I've always gotten good advice on WIPs here on SFM. keep it comin'!
  • cavebearcavebear178 Posts: 623Member
    traq wrote: »
    cavebear: I was thinking along those lines.

    concept-table.jpg

    I'll probably go with this solution. Dave: I know about "morphic" material, but I'm a little wary of it. :D not quite clear on how it works - not the technical details, mind you, but when it's an acceptable practice vs. a borderline-loophole for design flaws.

    Now that is an idea I never thought of! Now you have an emergency operating table and two other tables for all the equipment :)
  • Fre'dniFre'dni0 Posts: 0Member
    I like the idea.
    lately, been working on armatures, to rig a Mech model. Reading this post, I got an idea, so started on a model, for fold up seating. Resembles a barstool, without the stool. You and cavebear love the mechanics of modeling, can possibly guess at what I am talking about.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    lol, "resembles a barstool, without the stool" - I knew what you meant, but the first thing that came to mind was a guy sitting with a stick ...somewhere uncomfortable
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    traq wrote: »
    lol, "resembles a barstool, without the stool" - I knew what you meant, but the first thing that came to mind was a guy sitting with a stick ...somewhere uncomfortable
    HA!

    But really, the sad thing about traveller is that it is all about volume. It really should be about mass, but all the forums, Q&A's and all that say its solely about volume when jumping, else wise there would be a fuel saving if you jumped without a hold full of cargo.

    A morphic hull wouldn't work two well, as the protection ability of armor would be lost.

    As for the table. The general premise of your table doesn't really change. Just that the table reshapes its three parts to better service the current need. The Versis Tech isn't to the point of T1k's or even TX's More along the lines of Its the shake and texture of a wooden table or the shape of a surgical table with two instrument benches.

    The volume wouldn't change, just where that volume is located. Mechanical or Morphic its up to you haw you want to draw it.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    I could design a folding hull using interlocking armor plates supported by a morphic sheet. Combining several layers, you'd still have the armor protection, and the hull could be resized to take advantage of unused space during jumps.

    (I'm not suggesting this, just thought it was interesting... If fuel cost really is dictated by volume and not mass, then someone in the Traveler universe would have realized this design some time ago. In reality, I'm sure this rule has a lot to do with the fact that volume is easier (and more reliable) for a layman to calculate than mass, so is used as a representative measure. :) )
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    That, or the imperials are just boringly unimaginative.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    true.

    wip-0303-cabin.png

    So, what are everyone's thoughts on how I'm marking features "above" the floorplan - like the windows, and the curvature of the hull overhead? All those things that are worth pointing out, but belong (architecturally) on a Reverse Ceiling Plan.

    The plan so far is to:

    ...use dotted outlines
    ...use a reddish color to distinguish from deck features
    ...use opacity to show large areas (like windows)
    ...generally limit amount of detail shown

    Does anyone seriously object to this? Is it more confusing than it's worth? Anyone have a better idea?

    thanks guys
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    Well, you could keep it the way it is and also provide a side view. The side views would work well as inserts into the compartment descriptions. It would give the reader a greater perspective. I'm figuring that drawing a side view would be a lot less work than modeling out the hole ship inside and out. Unless thats what you intended to do.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    yes, I will be doing a side elevation view as well. I was just trying to find out if anyone thought this approach was confusing or too cluttered visually.

    and I was planning on modeling the interiors, but not right away. It could be a fun "update" or supplemental material.
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    Ah cool.
  • Fre'dniFre'dni0 Posts: 0Member
    Traq, I have talked to some in a Traveller forum. Common consensus is if the designer would use it the interior for combat purposes(getting around), and to be able to visualize weak spots, and is happy with it, the buyer would be too. Window visualization is good, for interior schematics, as is the hull overhead. Match this with a decent exterior hull model, it should sell well.
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    I'm inclined to agree.
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    So, any updates?
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    Here's a view of the forward cabins. They're the smallest of the eight passenger cabins, for "economy" passengers or staff for first class passengers. They're not terribly small, in any case. I considered giving them a shared, "jack & jill" refresher unit, but I think this gives more flexibility in use.

    In this shot you can also see that the forward hardpoint has been moved to the upper deck (previously it was in the same position, but on the lower deck). It is still accessed from the lower deck, via an extendable ladderwell. This opens up more cargo space in the lower deck hold, gives better dorsal coverage, and interferes less with the ship's lines.

    wip-0318-bow.png

    I have a few more WIP shots to post, and then I'll be focusing on the 3D model. The final plans will be previewed soon (not sure exactly when, yet) on RPGNow.com.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    Are wheels the way to go for Traveler? pads? crawlers?
    _0318_elev_block.png
  • Fre'dniFre'dni0 Posts: 0Member
    well, the air-rafts use some sort of anti grav propulsion, that would be first choice. Looking at most heavy movers, tracks are second. Now if on a landing pad, constructed of a solid base, for any tech level world, wheels would prolly be most used. Less damage from tracks
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    Thanks, that's what I figured. I don't think this will be rolling around much, but when it does, it will likely be at a paved spaceport.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    lading gear. each of the four six-wheel assemblies (including hydraulics) take up about 32m^3, or just over 2.25 dTons. they are positioned in the secondary hulls, on the centerline in the nose and just outboard of the jump drives.

    wip_0319-gear.png
  • Fre'dniFre'dni0 Posts: 0Member
    5 assemblies. One of your best points in design is always considering basic mechanical engineering principles. Still will be involved in futuristic craft
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    where did you envision installing the fifth assembly? and what prompted the concern?

    wheelprint.png
    (after I wrote the above post, I realized that I'd actually drawn four-wheel assemblies)

    here's how the bridge is coming : )

    wip_0319-bridge.png
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    Looks great.

    Ya, its unlikely that the forward cargo hold is going to have heavy cargo in it. That space is usually dedicated to passenger cargo and mail bags. So I don't foresee a problem with the nose dragging.

    If you want to be considered for the quality control team for this book, pm me. first 6 get in. You will get a free (digital) copy when its its published.
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    yeah, if it's mass you're worried about, the center of mass is (roughly) right behind and below the captain's chair. (I've edited the image in my post above.)

    most of the primary hull is habitat - i.e., empty space. the heaviest thing forward is the air/raft, and it's dwarfed by the power plant at the stern. Almost all of the ship's weight is in the fuel tankage, maneuver and jump drives - all of which are neatly balanced directly above the landing gear assemblies. the plans won't show it, but there is major structural framework in all those spots as well.

    Aft stateroom and passenger mess (which I'm considering labeling the "quarterdeck" due to its location and multipurpose nature):

    wip_0320-qdeck.png

    I hope everyone likes the dome window above the table. It took a lot of afterthought to install :D
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    sneak peek!

    wip_0320-sheet-1.png
  • Capt DaveCapt Dave0 Posts: 0Member
    OK, I have a formating question for you all.

    traq and i both think this banner could be better, but we aren't sure how.

    WIPDP.png

    Its pro is that Its easy for me to duplicate in the rest of the document, but i don't know. What do ya'll think?
  • traqtraq0 Posts: 0Member
    (this is the current color scheme)

    temp2.png
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