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3DA new Jupiter 2 that makes sense

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Posts

  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    Again, thanks! I'm continuing to refine the upper deck. I'll be working on a (more-or-less) practical method of retracting and storing the sliding crash doors over the viewport. Below are three images showing the sequence. There is sufficient storage space on either side of the flight deck for the mechanisms, tracks and the doors themselves. I suppose they should be thicker - and may end being so - but much of the ship's skin is super-magikal mystery metal so we'll see. :)

    I still have to make some adjustments to the floor and a few other things to eliminate the intersections going on as seen below.
    104006.jpg104007.jpg104008.jpg
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    I've pretty much finished the main deck, complete with engine greeblies. Here's a large plan. I'll add some more perspective shots later.

    Upper Deck Plan 01 Annotated.jpg

    I've begun work on the level above the main deck and am calling it the mezzanine. It is a low-ceilinged space (about 68 inches or 1.7 meters). But it provides access to some upper engine parts, the main rotating sensor bubble and the stellar observation dome. The dome was in the show's original blueprints but was never built.

    Basically the elevator pad could raise a person into a telescoping tube topped by the clear glass dome. The assembly is usually kept retracted. I thought, given the bigger size of the ship I could make something that was reasonably logical and actually worked. I'll probably outfit the interior of this small space with some instrumentation.

    Progress Mezzanine 01.jpg

    Surrounding the main sensor bubble is an articulated, retractable defensive laser cannon.

    Progress Mezzanine 02.jpg
    104672.jpg104673.jpg104674.jpg
  • AresiusAresius348 Posts: 4,148Member
    Kinda reminds me to the C57-D in the layout...

    Nice work, tho.
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    Aresius wrote: »
    Kinda reminds me to the C57-D in the layout...

    Nice work, tho.

    Yes, the Jupiter 2 in the TV series was designed by the same team that designed the C57-D so there are family resemblances. In this re-imagined successor I also wanted to keep the general aesthetics of the J-2.

    I've made some revisions by isolating the telescoping stellar observation tube from the rest of the deck with pressure doors, and have added some details. While it is a flying saucer and technically the ship could more in any direction, the fact that the Jupiter 2 was always depicted as moving "forward" implied that there were asymmetries in the circular engine. Here, large coils used in concert with the lower deck gravity modulators alter the drive field to make the ship move primarily horizontally.

    I'll be adding a bunch of small details to help make this more realistic, yet try to maintain the clean and seamless look of the show's ships and props.

    Progress Mezzanine 05.jpg
    104715.jpg
  • AresiusAresius348 Posts: 4,148Member
    Ah, cool. Didn't know that.
  • theCommandertheCommander0 Posts: 0Member
    This is an incredible undertaking and quite exuberating!!
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    More progress on the Mezzanine level. The central core is surrounded by additional mechanisms separated by the 8 radiating ribs. Cutouts in the ribs allow access through these service crawlspaces. On occasion in the show it was mentioned that the ship had its own force field generation system. Here it appears as 4 pairs of grids (in red) just below the upper hull surface.

    I've added a Pod Bay Control Room with a window to the bay itself. A small room with a ceiling just high enough for a seated crew member, this is where the robotic arm is controlled for deploying the space telescope and retrieving the micro-satellites from orbit.

    I'm still refining many of these components. For example, just above the main viewport will be the generators for the plasma window (a real device that exists only in laboratories right now at small scales). The plasma window protects the viewport from the vacuum pressures generated during hyperspeed. Much of the other equipment on this level consists of the "self-repairing" mechanisms that the Jupiter 2 supposedly had.
    104975.jpg104976.jpg
  • JeffJeff0 Posts: 0Member
    Ron, I'm sure everyone who has seen your work here ( as well as those who've yet to have the opportunity ) would consider what you've created here, your Jupiter ship to be absolutely exemplary. It is simply the finest example ever created, inside and out, of this great, iconic and most fondly remembered spacecraft. Just stunning. It was for me, and probably many many others the chief reason for following the progress of the web series that never came to fruition. The demise of that effort was a tremendous disappointment-but there is no point in dwelling on that, nothing to be gained. So...just wondering here, is there any possibility of you putting together a series of short animations, nothing epic, no extended story ideas, and hopefully nothing which would draw Mr. Burns' ire, but maybe five to ten minute "clips" to showcase your magnificent work? With all the work and thought that you've already invested, it seems almost regrettable that it won't have an opportunity to truly "fly", to be enjoyed to it's fullest.
    As with the original project, this might also possibly allow for some creative narrative input from those watching your progress. Seems this might ignite some of that vast imagination that was flowing so freely once upon a time. The interaction and involvement were a major part of the fun of that project, part, I think, of why we all so eagerly logged in almost daily. Is this something even worth consideration?

    BTW, when you have the Jupiter where you want it, I'm very much looking forward to seeing what you do with the C57 D. Can't wait.
  • gerb200gerb200176 Posts: 113Member
    Every time I see this updated I fall more and more in love with the design and the work that's gone into it.
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    Thanks again for the kind words and suggestions! @Jeff - Yes, I've been toying with the idea of creating sort of a "Crew Member's Introductory Guide to the Jupiter 3." As if Alpha Control made a video of the ship to serve as an overview for aspiring explorers. A friend of mine was a professional TV anchor and might be interested in narrating it.

    I'm really not too concerned about Mr. Burns' objections because I don't think he had a legal leg to stand on. I encouraged the producers to keep going with the project but they were spooked. Mr. Burns actually did not object to using the Jupiter 2 and the Robinson family - he just didn't want any "new adventures" with a new crew and ship, etc. I suppose it could jeopardize any future spin-offs or re-boots of the show if any of his storylines resembled anything we would have done, but the web series was clearly meant as a fan tribute and was definitely not for profit.
  • JeffJeff0 Posts: 0Member
    Avian wrote: »
    Thanks again for the kind words and suggestions! @Jeff - Yes, I've been toying with the idea of creating sort of a "Crew Member's Introductory Guide to the Jupiter 3." As if Alpha Control made a video of the ship to serve as an overview for aspiring explorers. A friend of mine was a professional TV anchor and might be interested in narrating it.

    I'm really not too concerned about Mr. Burns' objections because I don't think he had a legal leg to stand on. I encouraged the producers to keep going with the project but they were spooked. Mr. Burns actually did not object to using the Jupiter 2 and the Robinson family - he just didn't want any "new adventures" with a new crew and ship, etc. I suppose it could jeopardize any future spin-offs or re-boots of the show if any of his storylines resembled anything we would have done, but the web series was clearly meant as a fan tribute and was definitely not for profit.

    Agreed, I thought the project, along with all of the wonderful and creative exchanges with so many interested parties was abandoned all too easily, which in turn made me wonder if Rhodes hadn't already mentally moved on to another project and simply needed some small reason to toss in the towel, as it were.
    One idea occurred, kind of tying into the Introductory Guide concept; doing a deck by deck, cabin by cabin tour of your Jupiter and led/hosted by the Robot. He could interact with the various controls throughout the ship, demonstrating different functions and allowing us viewers to learn about different facets that might not be evidenced in an episode. I guess that would require finding someone that could do a reasonable impression of Tufeld's voice characterizations though, but still...Or maybe a doesn't-quite-have-all-the-bugs-worked-out-yet Robot tour, with a not-yet standardized voice set, could offer some comic elements. And maybe, on a background screen, a video of an elephant bouncing on a trampoline, without addressing or explaining it.
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    ^Great ideas, Jeff. I'll keep them in mind!

    There is an additional 44" of space between the lower deck floor and the fusion core. I thought I'd fill it with some sleek engine parts that relate to the flashing of the lights around the 32-panel fusion core. There are 32 firing guns encircling a drum-shaped "deutronium" fuel tank. The sequential firing of 4 guns at a time produce the rotating light effect. It's still conceptual and I probably won't do too much more than this.
    105078.jpg
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 789Member
    Amazing work Ron. The attention to detail and imagination used is second to none.

    Just how many lights in the fusion core are on at a time when the J2 is in flight. I've heard both 4 and 8. I've been trying to watch the old shows but it is pretty hard to actually see what is going on. The rotation seems to fluctuate in speed and there appears to be a section where no lights are on at all.

    Because I've been watching the J2 so closely I did notice for the first time the guide wires that the J2 used during the crash sequence to make it look like it is flight. What first caught my attention is sunlight reflecting off the two wires. And upon further inspection you can make out the wires during most of the sequence. Always wondered how they simulated the ship crashing.

    Al
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    I've been using 4 lights since it works well with the 32-panel fusion core, but of course 8 would work well too. I think that it varied quite a bit on the show.

    I also noticed the guide wires in the crash sequence. It's still a thrilling moment though!

    I altered the area between the fusion core and the lower deck floor to include a crawlspace to access the equipment there. A crouching figure is shown for reference, as is the floor hatch that was on the original J2. I figured that hatch had to go somewhere, hence the crawlspace.

    twjt.jpg
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    I've added a few tanks and the lower half of the force field generation grid, and I think this will pretty much complete this level. I'm probably going to start work on a couple more videos.

    lm7k.jpg
  • gerb200gerb200176 Posts: 113Member
    I know I say this every time you post a new progress picture, but this is so stunning and I cannot wait to see more.
  • AresiusAresius348 Posts: 4,148Member
    hm... I'm not entirely sure that this level is complete. It seems so .. empty.
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    ^It's deceptive. The lower deck occupies almost all of the seemingly empty space. The lower deck floor sits right on top of the center hub. All the peripheral engine parts you see here are on the lower deck. Next to the blue crouching man is the floor hatch; you can imagine where the floor level is from that. This entire "sub-basement" varies from 44" in height (where the crouching man is) to 0" in height at the point where the hull breaks.
  • stanjm311stanjm3110 Posts: 0Member
    I have been following the development here and on you tube and even at your website on the Jupiter 3 project. I have to say your work is AWESOME! I have loved this ship since I was a kid. It fired my imagination and I hated the direction the show took when it went campy! I always loved the episodes with the ship highlighted. Your version is everything I always wanted for the Jupiter. It is logical, well thought out and yet updated for today's more sophisticated audience. I hope someday soon you can do a few short animations of this version of the ship in flight. It is truly well thought out! And deserving of "some time in the sun!" Thank you so much.
  • TralfazTralfaz252 Posts: 789Member
    Hey,

    Just found this at Cult TV Man wesite. Thought you might be interested.

    Al

    http://culttvman.com/main/drew-petitclercs-jupiter-2-frame/
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    ^ Too Kool! Thanks, Al.

    I put a model of the flight Pod in the Pod Bay on the main deck. I think I'll play around with the design a bit more and detail the interior of the Pod.
    105373.jpg105374.jpg105375.jpg
  • JeffJeff0 Posts: 0Member
    As always, gorgeous work. I have a tech question; do the legs on the pod fold into the craft (for atmospheric flight purposes I guess), or simply act as shock absorbers on landing? Am loving all the detail of the Jupiter interior coming together. It occurred to me that in any such craft, or, say a submarine, the amount of space taken up by necessary functions of life support, propulsion and engineering, just wiring and ducting, as well as all the secondary and tertiary elements would account for a much greater percentage of interior volume of the available space relative to that required for habitation by a crew. Seeing the Jupiter with her "lid off", and with roughly the same crew and control area layout and spacing as the original, I think I just realized for the first time how correct she now seems, and how inadequate the original actually was on the show. Same applies to the Seaview and Spindrift I would guess. As a kid I loved all the Allen vehicles, never questioned how they were actually supposed to work-well, except for the flying sub, loved that little sub but NEVER figured out that fit. Can't wait to see her lift off.
  • AresiusAresius348 Posts: 4,148Member
    Love it. For me, the pod looks like it's been cut off from some bigger vessel. Then again, given the size of the docking/landing area, it shouldn't be much bigger.
  • JeffJeff0 Posts: 0Member
    Avian wrote: »
    ^ Too Kool! Thanks, Al.

    I put a model of the flight Pod in the Pod Bay on the main deck. I think I'll play around with the design a bit more and detail the interior of the Pod.

    An errant (and probably misguided) thought occurred while at work last night and my mind wandered (and as I drive a public transportation vehicle, you might not wish to be a passenger of mine I guess...easily distracted). So anyway, was thinking of that Flight Pod (which, btw, I prefer to Space Pod) which I imagine is computer controlled on launch and retrieval, and possibly even during normal flight procedures. BUT!!! what if some those computers are somehow compromised by the heat of a comet passing too near (yeah, I know) or some space particle explodes in the solar-framaphutzer? Well, then you're up space creek without a
    spanner, or, of course Dr. Smith could rashly push another wrong control button, necessitating a manual control or retrieval of the Pod.
    And so I was wondering about the possibility of a launch arm. You have designed a pair of telescoping arms to lower the Chariot from beneath the Jupiter and I was thinking something similar, but with a pair of grappling arms (similar to those arms on the pods in 2001) on a telescoping lift might mate to connecting points either side of the Pod's hatch. It could lift the Pod free of the Jupiter, then rotate it away from it's parent craft and send it on whatever mission. This could make for some interesting visuals as well as creating a useful detail on the back side of the Pod. And once retrieved and lowered, the grapplers would disconnect and fold out of the way while the Pod rotated around to open the hatch. Possibly you could incorporate the lifting arm you've already added to the Pod bay area.
    This whole idea actually was born out of watching bloopers or maybe outtakes from the third season of the Space Pod getting hung up during it's drop from the Jupiter which I found slightly hilarious. But it's just a thought, and frankly comes from a very tired brain way too late at night...and I may also have seen a dragon, so...
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    ^Yes, I've thought about a launch arm for the Flight Pod, but given the restrictions of the Pod Bay doors it would be difficult to fit both through the opening. That's why there is a aligning mechanism in the floor to help lock the Pod in the proper orientation so it can enter and exit accurately. The arm used for the space telescope would only be utilized when the Pod is outside. And the Pod itself would take over the final positioning of the telescope once free of the launch arm. :)

    That said however, I do like your idea of lifting the Pod up and through the doors, essentially creating a take-off/landing platform. I'll check it out and perhaps do an iteration of the procedure. Thanks!

    I've also re-created some of the props used in the show. Here, for example, is the water condenser...
    105925.jpg
  • spacefighterspacefighter0 Posts: 0Member
    haven't really been watching this thread but noticed there's some extraordinary detail here. well done on having the willpower and skill to do the full interior of a ship, every last screw, wire and speck of dust by the look of it.
  • JeffJeff0 Posts: 0Member
    Avian wrote: »
    ^Yes, I've thought about a launch arm for the Flight Pod, but given the restrictions of the Pod Bay doors it would be difficult to fit both through the opening. That's why there is a aligning mechanism in the floor to help lock the Pod in the proper orientation so it can enter and exit accurately. The arm used for the space telescope would only be utilized when the Pod is outside. And the Pod itself would take over the final positioning of the telescope once free of the launch arm. :)

    That said however, I do like your idea of lifting the Pod up and through the doors, essentially creating a take-off/landing platform. I'll check it out and perhaps do an iteration of the procedure. Thanks!

    I've also re-created some of the props used in the show. Here, for example, is the water condenser...

    Um, yeah, went back and looked at the shuttle Pod's bay and launch doors and that IS a tight space, hadn't really looked that closely before. And a lifting platform would do the job equally well, maybe supported by columns either side of the Pod. Though long-winded, my actual thinking was (and this was predicated on the original series cast) possibly involving the women or kids (Smith would be less than useless) in some story lines requiring them to pilot the Pod. And while their piloting skills would likely suffice, launch and retrieval might need an assist, especially in the event of a system failure effecting the Pod.
    Would also have REALLY liked to have seen Maureen or Judy strap on a laser and grab the keys to the chariot now and then, and go take care of business, rather than helplessly exclaiming "Oh John (Don), the children are out there, you've got to go get them".
    Also, like the water condenser, lookin' forwaed the the forcefield projector.
  • BattlegiraffeBattlegiraffe0 Posts: 0Member
    I've been watching the progress of this design for some time, and finally joined this group to add a few thoughts. This is absolutely top-notch work, and I'm so glad you're taking it all the way. It's wonderful to FINALLY see the Jupiter 2 as the large-sized spaceship I always felt it should have been. I love the new directions you've taken most recently, including the use of absolutely every inch of the interior, and the addition of upper deck cabins, briefing room, cargo/storage rooms, lower deck medical bay, satellite control, etc. Here are some random thoughts for you to consider.
    1. The front windows on the lower deck - have you ever considered that from a design point of view, these might be very practical as a direct viewport from inside the upper level flight deck, if the floor in front of the pilots were transparent--or eliminated? The windows are obviously angled poorly for viewing outside from the lower deck, and while I applaud your creativity in making this a satellite launch bay, I have always wanted to see what those lower deck windows would look like from the pilots' seats on the upper level flight deck, looking down through the floor and out those lower ports, which could be opened to aid in visual manual landing approaches, etc. It would be a truly panoramic view! Yes, it would require a redesign of the control panels, I'm afraid... but that's what I love about your designs. You're slowly starting to depart from the idea that everything must be designed exactly as it was in the TV series. I applaud those departures when they result in new and creative ideas!
    2. I agree with a couple others who have mentioned the need for airlocks on ALL exit ports from the ship. Is there a way to exchange the places of the lower deck bathroom and add an airlock/decontamination room at the top of the landing gear stairway? There already seems to be a small one at the top of the robot lift (which is ingenious, by the way). What about the third landing leg - what's it for? On the older Shane Johnson J2 blueprints, at least one leg contains compartments for EVA equipment storage.
    3. Speaking of Robot lifts, why not use the elevator, instead, as a combined robot lift/airlock, and give it the ability to descend, through an extendable airlock tube, through the lower hull and onto the ground? It looks like you're doing something similar in allowing the elevator to lift up into the mezzanine for the steller observation dome. (Great idea, that mezzanine! Any way to make the elevator open into the mezzanine, for rolling larger pieces of equipment?)
    4. Is there a reason why the chariot is not stored intact? Is it too tall? If so, where are the window frames and glass pieces stowed? It would seem to be more practical to keep the chariot fully intact for structural reasons, even if it meant altering the upper deck a bit so that the height of the chariot would extend upward through the normal "floor" of the upper deck.
    5. I was excited to see the recently-added maintenance crawl space around the drive ring under the lower deck floor. But is it really needed? It would seem to me that it's wasted space, especially when it would be more practical to have the entire circular drive assembly be designed with the ability to rise up, intact, from the circular open floor on the lower deck. This would make maintenance almost casual, and able to be done in shirt-sleeve comfort there on the lower deck. Unless there are radiation dangers in doing so. Either way, the crawl space is another very clever idea.
    6. Love the new space pod. Does IT have an airlock? Seems like it should.
    7. For that matter, aside from staying true to the original show, is there any reason the chariot shouldn't be completely redesigned with lots of practical interior spaces, including an airlock as well? Not every planet they land on would have a breathable atmosphere.
    8. You included this at one point, I believe... where is laundry done? And how?
    9. Do you have any detailed pictures of the medical bay yet? I'm dying to see that part, as well as the expanded kitchen. (edit: Oh, I see the galley pics in an earlier post! Nice!)
    10. I'd love to see an animated version of how the pod bay doors open (from the outside), and whether there is a direct viewport from the mezzanine "pod bay control room". Seems like that would help.
    Again, I'm delighted to see this wonderful ship take full form and shape, and all her interior spaces utilized fully. I grew up watching the show and it is, to this day, still my favorite ship of all time. Nice to see you doing full justice to its great design!
  • AvianAvian175 Posts: 209Member
    Thanks for the thoughtful suggestions Battlegiraffe! I've been away for a couple of weeks so I apologize for not responding right away. I'll take your points above in kind:

    1. The Lower Viewport - This is an interesting suggestion. The original reasoning behind using the lower viewport hull opening for launching microsatellites was based upon the storylines developed for the web series. Since that project is now defunct there is no reason for a large microsat bay and thus perhaps they could be launched from another area. Combining the lower viewport with the flight deck would - as you point out - create quite a panorama. I will look into that!

    2. The Landing Legs - The reasoning behind having no airlock on landing leg #1 and having one instead on #2 (the robot /cargo lift) was to provide two different entry/exit points for the actors with two different conditions while still maintaining an aspect of practicality. That is, a planet/moon/spaceship with a toxic or no atmosphere would require the use of the airlock exit. A friendly external environment would allow the use of leg #1 without having to go through the extra step of an airlock and would streamline the action for the audience. It also added the potential for more drama, such as a case where the one airlock is damaged and the crew must devise an alternate (and clever) way to exit the ship safely. Landing leg #3 contains hoses and electrical connectors to power devices - such as a force field generator - on the ground while the ship is landed. It also has a connection for a hose & pump to draw up fresh water from an external source. There is a recycling center just above the leg and adjacent to the lower level bath.

    3. The elevator - You're right, the elevator could be re-designed to lower to the ground but because we had a whole landing leg available for a robot/cargo lift + airlock we thought it was a good idea to use that instead. The Mezzanine is a low-ceilinged space and the equipment there is considered "permanent" and part of the functional drive of the ship. Once again, drama dictates that any changes or swapping of parts might require an EVA in space to access these components from outside the hull via magnetically locked access panels, or dismantling of the upper hull while the ship is grounded.

    4. The Chariot - Yes, the chariot is too tall to fit in the bay if fully assembled. (The deck height is 7'-6" or 2.3 meters) We thought the chassis would be complete but the superstructure would be assembled on the ground, which ties into the original episode "Island in the Sky" where Don mentions the need to assemble the chariot. There are cabinets lining the wall to the left of the chariot ramp that house the components of the superstructure. As far as a re-design, yes, you are absolutely right. In fact the web series director wanted to utilize a full-size working chariot that would be a relatively inexpensive futuristic re-working of an existing vehicle such as a Hummer.

    5. Crawl space - This exists for dramatic purposes as a claustrophobic and potentially dangerous space for the actors. It works with the geometry of the larger ship so that's why it is under the deck. But I like your idea that the whole assembly could be raised into the lower deck commons area!

    6. No the Flight Pod (not Space Pod) does not have an airlock. In the web series it's prime function would be as a recon/exploration vehicle used on a planet while the ship is grounded. It thus functions almost like a conventional jet aircraft. That's why it exits the ship upwards from the main deck. It's secondary function would be as a space vehicle. Once again, drama takes center stage (remember the scene in 2001 when Dave has to blow the explosive bolts to exit his pod).

    7. Answered in #4 above.

    8. The laundry is on the main deck between the Pilot's cabin and the bath. It utilizes a magical/technologically advanced system to clean clothes :). (See: June Lockhart)

    9. The Medical Bay is fairly detailed but I haven't posted much about it. I will endeavor to post new images soon.

    10. Yes, there is a small viewing window between the Pod Control Room on the Mezzanine Deck and the Pod Bay. I have made animations of the Pod Doors retracting but I don't remember if I ever uploaded them. I'll put that on my to-do list as well.

    All in all, the new Jupiter 2 (or, if you prefer, the Jupiter 3) is a vehicle that does not necessarily forsee all disasters that could occur. If the ship were "perfect" then where is the drama for the web series? :) The ship was designed to be practical yet with some flaws that allow for the creation of plots where the crew would have to overcome (or even succumb to) the defects.
  • hamiltonplhamiltonpl0 Posts: 0Member
    I just read through this thread and am enjoying all the pictures that you have posted, Ron. Also, I sent you a PM about the OBJ models of some of your work, Would it be possible to share some of this on SciFi Meshes?

    Love that Keeper Ship and Fuel Barge. After being laid off in December, I am getting back to some more CG animation and am exploring learning Blender. I would rather though not reinvent any perfect wheels that you have already constructed with your amazing modeling talent.

    Keep us all updated on your progress!
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