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Classic Lost in Space Project

124

Posts

  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    I begrudgingly admit that I'm a fan of the movie version as well. Yeah, John Hurt's acting is akin to a dimestore wooden Indian, the kid who played Will was just plain AWFUL, and the story collapses under its own weight at the end; but there is a lot to like about it, too. The design of the Jupiter 2 (both the interior and exterior) is amazing. Matt LeBlanc did an incredible job; there is absolutely no hint of Joey from "Friends" in his performance. Gary Oldman was...well, as great as he always is. And finally, any movie that has Heather Graham in it get an automatic two stars fro me.

    Sorry, didn't mean to hijack or redirect this thread. We now return you to the original subject, already in progress.
  • PagrinPagrin0 Posts: 0Member
    As it happens there was an attempted reboot a little while ago which you can find on Youtube. Still nothing with the charm of the original J2 however.
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    Pagrin wrote: »
    As it happens there was an attempted reboot a little while ago which you can find on Youtube. Still nothing with the charm of the original J2 however.

    I've seen that reboot. It was called "The Robinsons: Lost in Space and it was actually a TV pilot that director John Woo financed with his own money to pitch to what was then the WB network, but they passed on the series. It radically changed much of the original concepts, but overall it isn't a bad re-interpretation at all. If you're a LIS fan, I suggest checking it out.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Yes, I watched that too. I agree, it's not bad at all. The sets were purchased by Ronald Moore's production house and used as the interiors for the Battlestar Pegasus in BSG.

    Perhaps objections to the re-boot and the movie have to do with the aesthetics of the hardware. While the movie gives a nod to the original J2, both shows try to re-interpret the ships in completely new ways. While I don't necessarily object to that, I find that the designs are not fresh at all. They look interchangeable with any other XYZ science fiction show that Hollywood has produced.

    Many of you have noted the inconsistencies (and impossibilities) inherent in the original designs. Even when I was a kid watching the show I was often puzzled by contradictions in the sets. That said, I am tempted to start another thread called "Beyond Lost in Space" as a companion to this one. In it we could all offer suggestions and designs for a consistent re-do of the J2, Pod and other items, keeping to the spirit of Kino****a's designs.

    For example, Buckaroohawk commented on the design of the Space Pod and I couldn't agree more. In fact I did do a re-design of the thing based on the aesthetics of the J2. It's not completely thought out but I thought I'd post it here anyway.

    The rear protrusions are docking pins. The viewport wraps around a pilot seat. The Pod measures about 8x14 feet with just enough headroom to squeeze in the Robot. I didn't design landing gear, but assumed some sort of retractable feet. I wanted to keep it fairly aerodynamic since its primary use is to be the landing shuttle to a planet.

    (I did do another version but it ended up looking like Darth Vader's helmet!)
    82354.jpg82355.jpg82356.jpg82357.jpg82358.jpg
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    Nice job on the space pod(original). And yes, I have my share of problems with it - the design, that is, not you.

    I keep wondering what its exact specifications are. I would, for example design a limited use orbit to ground to orbit vehicle. I would have put in as much capability as possible. For just in case you need it type situations...

    Now that Pod design that is modeled after the larger ship makes more more sense to me, because having things stick out, just design look right to me, unless it is intended to be vacuum only operation.

    But this little pod, yes, I think you came up with something good there...

    But in either case, it should have smaller versions of what the J-2 had. That is a force field genrator - sized and powered for the pod.

    And in either case, I would expect the Robot to plug into the controls if needed, to control the pod if need be. This is one of the things that botheres me - the robot, should be an extension to the ship itself. With processing capability either/or. Maybe even have its own Unitech drive for the upper half of the robot for use in vaccumm and other places. The lower half would be there(the part with the treads, to conserve power/fuel.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Great ideas Nick! Yes, it makes perfect sense that the Robot is an integral part of all the J2 systems, including the Pod. I'll keep that in mind if I continue with a Space Pod re-design. I like the idea that the upper torso of the Robot can be plugged into the Pod. After all, I believe that was the case when he was riding in the Chariot as early as the first few episodes.

    Here's a brief animation of the Pod. Again, the music clip is from the (I think, brilliant) incidental music to the show, by John Williams. This particular music clip captures the loneliness of space quite well, so I thought it would work with the depiction of the little Space Pod flying all by itself, piloted by the Robot:
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    Nicely done. The movement and lighting all look great. I loved the interactive lighting effects as the pod left the J2 and moved down past the ship's main drive system. Actually, I'm wondering how you pulled off that rotating light effect. The J2 model in my library has an .AVI file to simulate the lights, but there isn't any reflection on the ship's hull.

    I also like your own pod design, but it's shape got me thinking why not take it one step further and integrate the pod into the hull of the J2? Instead of being stored within the ship, it's actually a part of the main hull that separates from it and goes on its merry way. When connected, the only things that betray it's location are the viewport windows (which would face roughly starboard aft) and a thin seam in the hull of the J2. You might have to lose the sensor bubble on the top, but you could keep the main drive underneath it by having the pod launch up and away from the ship. I may have to work up a quick model of this to show what I'm describing here. Not sure if this is getting the idea across.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    And what happens if you lost the pod? Then you have this gapping hole in the side of the J-2. Which will give you troble coming into an atmosphere...

    Better to have it closed off, and only opened when the pod is in use.

    But looking at that test clip. It got me thinking, how does the pod deorbit? An antigrav drive isn't going to be much help, unless there is more to it. Yes, I know that the Technical manual have a chemical powered rocket(Hydrogen/Oxygen) to move it. But that uses too much in the way of fuel. In other words I can see one deorbit at best, but no retrun. At least as stated.

    The Unitech drive must be more able than thought. Much more.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    ...Actually, I'm wondering how you pulled off that rotating light effect. The J2 model in my library has an .AVI file to simulate the lights, but there isn't any reflection on the ship's hull...

    Hi Buckaroohawk. It's a simple set-up actually. The gravity drive has 3 parts. An open cage, inside of which is a rotating ring, plus a bottom cap. The rotating ring has self-illuminating sub-materials applied to each facet (the ring is intentionally not smoothed, and has 24 facets for the pod. A similar set-up for the saucer has 32 facets). Omni lights are linked to the ring. Additionally, the rotating ring has a glow effect applied that is dependent on the color intensity. (The glow's Occlusion is 100%, so the glow only shows through the holes in the fixed cage.) That's it.

    detailinfo01.jpg

    I like the idea of the Pod as part of the hull, but i also think Nick's point is valid too. Maybe there is a clever compromise?? I'll think about that! :)
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    Hmmm....


    Doors... The pod is a pie slice. When it leaves the ship, Doors open(non pressurized) strong enough to handle air flow over the ship - especially if for some reason the ship coming in on them (off axis entry). Instead of the proper way.

    The result would look the same, but take up less room inside the ship (Jupiter 2) It could be a half height bottom slice as well. Better yet if a top slice that takes up deck one. This way you have slightly more room for its Unitech, on its bottom. But those doors have to be aerodynamic... That is the whole hull has to be smooth there.

    Your Pod, in this context is almost right, in its design...
  • kedamonokedamono171 Posts: 0Member
    Ever thought of doing some remastered shots from the series? Like the J2 and the Bubble People's spaceship or the J2 crashing though the cinders of the destroyed planet? Also, have you thought about adding some... well, grime to the models to make them well used. I figure the J2 has reentry soot all over it.
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    Nick,
    I hadn't considered the ramifications of the J2's atmospheric entry without the pod attached in my design idea. You're right; that could make for a dangerous entry and landing. My only thought was that it would look cool and give the pod a more logical fit with the J2 itself. An outer sliding door would solve that problem, but then the pod's hull wouldn't necessarily have to strictly conform to the shape of the saucer. Of course, if it did, that would make it much more stable during hazardous flying maneuvers (like avoiding crumped pieces of aluminum foil, for example) when it's docked in its berth.

    I believe we may be on the verge of overthinking this whole subject. Trying to apply logic to a sci-fi show (especially "Lost in Space") is an exercize in futility, really. Let's see what our illustrious thread-starter comes up with next and have some fun with that.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    I have taken my time to reply, on purpose.

    Looking cool, isn't where it's at.

    Being right is where it's at.

    The problem with the J2, isn't the design is wrong, it is that not enough background work was done. But is another generation's fault, not ours. We are in another words stuck.
  • Lizzy777Lizzy777228 PNWPosts: 396Member
    The answer for atmospheric re-entry, or anything in particular for sci-fi is simple!

    Force Fields.

    It's like the "It's magic!" explanation.
    What? Me, worry?
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Yes Lizzy! And it's sometimes frustrating when the implications of technology are ignored. I like the books by Larry Niven, who usually postulates a particular invention, say, a stasis field. But he then reasonably extrapolates the implications of that technology. For example, if you really had stasis field technology, then every single crash becomes survivable. The field simply snaps on - like an airbag - at the moment of impact. You also become invulnerable to weapons for the same reason. A single technological development like that can change the dynamics of an entire culture.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    And what happens is there is a power failure? At the worst possible moment?
  • rojrenrojren282 Louisville, Kentucky USAPosts: 1,457Member
    Nick R. wrote: »
    And what happens is there is a power failure? At the worst possible moment?

    The beginning of a script?
    "Tradition: Letting dead people make your decisions for you."
    -- Sir Terry Pratchett (paraphrase)
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    A B-movie script, that is.

    One of my frustration with ST: TNG was that they started out fine. But then they started trying trying to find ways around what the writer's guide laid down.

    When you do that, you jump the shark.
  • rojrenrojren282 Louisville, Kentucky USAPosts: 1,457Member
    Nick R. wrote: »
    A B-movie script, that is.

    One of my frustration with ST: TNG was that they started out fine. But then they started trying trying to find ways around what the writer's guide laid down.

    When you do that, you jump the shark.

    I don't know... Isaac Asimov did quite well setting up rules, then figuring how to break them, with his robots, and their three (later four) laws.

    I think it's all in the execution.
    "Tradition: Letting dead people make your decisions for you."
    -- Sir Terry Pratchett (paraphrase)
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    That is fantastic work. Love it
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Thanks Dav!

    Here's an animation of half of the Lower Deck, showing the Galley (with Seed Bank), the Lab and the Auxiliary Flight Control room. The preview image below shows that I added a small First Aid station and a Spectrometer to otherwise blank areas of the Lab. And for those unfamiliar with the ship, those 3 tall green cylinders are supposedly algae processing units.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Oh, and here's some trivia for you!

    See those wall-mounted control panels in the Galley animation above? Those props show up again in the Dharma station in Season 2 of Lost. The panel is right next to Locke's head:

    losts2dharma01.jpg

    Goes to show you that, even after 40 years, those old Burroughs computers still have a visual kick.
  • BuckaroohawkBuckaroohawk1 Posts: 0Member
    Wow! Beautiful animation. Sometimes it looks so darn close to real it's a bit scary. I still can't even come close to that level of realism. Excellent work!

    So old props from LIS showed up on "Lost"? Hard to believe they still exist after all these years. Studios have a (bad) habit of pitching stuff like that too easily. Nice to know someone somewhere managed to save them from the trash heap.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Thanks, Buckaroohawk. Yes, there is an actual website that exists for nothing other than to track these particular props as they appear on various TV shows through the decades. And I think I'm obsessive sometimes :)
  • TralfazTralfaz66 Posts: 657Member
    Great as always Avian.

    And it makes sense to have older style computer components in Lost, since the Dharma initiative was started back in the 1970's. The computer components wouldn't have been quite so old back then.

    Al
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    And could have been picked up from some second rate dealer on the cheap...
  • MarkyDMarkyD0 Posts: 0Member
    Well I just think you need a big fat "A" for awsomeness..


    that is just so bloody cool, and work that has gone into the modelling / rendering and then the ainmated textures.. bloody good job man.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    First, thanks everyone for the comments! I appreciate people's interest. I didn't expect many would pay much attention to the designs of such an old show that is rarely even seen anymore. But it's been fun to re-visit these great pieces.

    I've been so concerned about the interiors that I haven't been able to get back to the outside of the ship. My original renderings and animations were using an older, incorrect profile for the Jupiter 2, so I went back and revised it. The changes are subtle but they make all the difference in the world, as you can see in the attached pic. The new profile matches the classic hero filming miniature, and is 52 feet in diameter.

    The changes are most noticeable in the stance of the ship on its landing legs. The "shoulders" of the ship are broader, which slightly alters the shape of the main viewport. The lower hull and gear are slightly squatter, which hugs the ground a bit more.

    Although both models show it correctly now, I originally did not have the 3 landing legs positioned properly. They are actually rotated 8 degrees from the main axis defined by the viewports. This has to do with the issue of a tripod gear used with an octant-based structural system.
    82598.jpg
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]0 Posts: 3Member
    About fifteen years ago, a book was published - if I remember the name correctly - The Milleium Project: How to Colonize the Galaxy in Eight Easy Steps

    In this book about half way through, they have the design of the colonization ships, as they thought of them. What is interesting from the point of view of this thread, is that fifty years before the colonist's ships are launched, freighters are launched at ten percent of light. The colonists are launched in smaller versions, at half light. The point was to have both arive at the same time to the target star system. The freighters would carry everything needed to support the colony. Each colonist ship would carry one hundred people in suspended animation.

    Oh, one unique feature of both classes is what they were to be made of water ice. There would very stream lined to handle the interstellar environment better.

    So I wonder if, there was a freighter launched before the Jupiter 2 was... And what it would look like.
  • AvianAvian81 Posts: 194Member
    Interesting question, Nick. I'm open to suggestions! If the LIS world really was intending to send "10 million families per year" to Alpha Centauri, then there would have to be thousands of Jupiters under construction, plus freighters, probes, defensive ships (those darned Bubble Creatures are PO'd I'm sure!), survey ships, etc.
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